Pin It

The Science Of Fat Grafting

Transferring fat from areas of the body it is not wanted to areas that the patient wants to plump up or contour is called fat grafting. It is sometimes also called fat transfer or lipofilling, and it is one of the most effective and lowest risk options in body contouring procedures.

Unlike an implant or an injection, transferring fatty tissue from your own body is not introducing any foreign materials, which means there is less risk of any type of complications. Additionally, the fat is removed using a tiny incision and a cannula to pull out the fat tissue, and then a syringe to inject it into the desired location. This means no large incisions and much less risk of any type of infection at the incision site.

How it Works

Fat is typically harvested from the abdominal area, the inner thigh area or the buttocks. The incisions for the cannula are about 3mm in length, and a small amount of fat is removed over a specific area, leaving it smooth and even.

The fat removed in the fat grafting is then processed, which can involve putting it in a centrifuge to remove any other material from the fat tissue. It can also be rinsed or filtered to remove any other biological material.

This prepared fat is then injected into the area to be plumped or contoured. This can be the lips, in lines around the mouth, eyes, and nose and even to create more prominent cheekbones. Very small amounts of fat are injected into any one location, leaving a natural look to the surface.

There is some swelling in the areas that are enhanced through fat grafting, and some slight discomfort at the site where the fat was harvested. This typically lasts about three days at the most, with the swelling and slight bruising most commonly associated with treatment around the lip area.